Posts filed under Health

Webster Farmers Market: Preserving a Historic Neighborhood through Farming, Food, Craft, and Community

When my friends told me about a Sunday Winter Farmers Market, my husband and I jumped in the van and headed to Webster Township. It was a particularly cold day. Thankfully, aromatic hot coffee greeted us at the door. Violet Raterman, one of the market managers, helped us navigate the market for our first visit. The entire experience was moving for some reason, but I could not put my finger on it. I had to find out more about the people behind this market and the space in which it thrived. 

Essential Oils? Why Now?

Plant-based remedies have been used for centuries. Chemical constituents found in plants are now synthetically created in sterile, replicable laboratory environments. Those medical advances have done wonders to further research and understanding of the intricacies of the human body. So, why has a sudden resurgence in using essential oils saturated newsfeeds, yoga studios, moms’ clubs, and more? 

Understanding Detoxification

What comes to mind when you hear the word “detox”? You might think drug or alcohol detox. Perhaps fasting or eating and drinking things like wheatgrass juice is what comes to mind. It may surprise you to learn that detoxing is none of those things. In fact, my interpretation will change your entire outlook on what a detox is.

Posted on September 1, 2018 and filed under Food & Nutrition, Food Section, Health, Issue 70.

Miso Packs a Punch for Health and Taste

When I turned nineteen, a whole new world of food was opened up to me through the People’s Food Co-Op. Although my aunt and father had been members since the 1970s, and I was somewhat knowledgeable about natural food diets, I certainly did not know what the heck to do with a salty paste made of fermented soy beans, rice, or barley. I had enjoyed miso soup in Japanese restaurants, but that was not the best introduction, as it was thin and lacked vegetables and other ingredients we now use more abundantly, such as shiitake mushrooms, soba noodles, seaweed, lotus root, dried fish, and fermented vegetables. As western society’s knowledge of the world of natural foods has matured, thanks in part to the growing “foodie culture,” we have widened our awareness of whole food cooking and ingredients.

Be Brilliant! How Hospice Saved and Enhanced My Life

The word “hospice” is one of those terms to which each individual has a unique and palpable reaction. For some it brings a sense of fear or uneasiness. In others it arouses tender memories of a past experience as it relates to a family member. For a lucky handful, their faces light up when engaged in a conversation regarding end of life care in the capable and compassionate hands of hospice staff. These blessed few seem filled with peace and joy in the face of this word. As with all of life, we perceive it through our own lenses, which shape how we feel about any given situation. My personal experience and perception of hospice is filtered through many different experiences with friends, family, and from volunteering for a children’s grief program I helped create with Hospice of Asheville, North Carolina, in the early eighties. I’ve had several close friends cared for by their loving hands during end stages of life, and three of my grandparents and my mother-in-law were in hospice care before they passed out of this earthly plane with loved ones by their side. I know what it takes to be a volunteer and how impactful it was to receive comfort and care, both in facilities and in-home

Posted on September 1, 2018 and filed under Healing, Health, integrative medicine, Interviews, Issue 70, Wellness.

Forest Therapy ~ Embracing Nature, Connecting with Others

On the night before winter solstice in 2017, I was part of a small group that set out at dusk from the parking lot at Matthaei Botanical Gardens, carrying paper globes as we entered the adjacent woods on a footpath. Our guide, Ann Arbor artist and art teacher Cayla Samano, had distributed the lanterns beforehand. As darkness came down around us, the light-sensitive globes turned on, bright white orbs in the shadowy woods. Ice and snow crunched underfoot. We took our time, Cayla reminding us not to rush, asking us to slow our pace. 

Transformation Is Here — Capuchin Ministries of Detroit

Driving on Gratiot headed toward Mt. Elliott Street, I was in the heart of downtown Detroit, just a mile or so away from Ford Field. It seems only small businesses are here, a Mr. Fish and a crowded shop selling second hand furniture, likely for a charity. In this place on this map, blocks of the grid are disappearing. Fallow fields sit waiting in their place. I pulled up to a bright brick church anchored strong amidst open green plots and dilapidated, boarded-up structures. There is a man sitting on a milkcrate. He is sentinel of this corner.

Posted on September 1, 2017 and filed under Food & Nutrition, Healing, Health, Profile, Programs.

Expanding the Scope of Practice: How University of Michigan Medical School is Training Medical Doctors to Have a Deeper Understanding of Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Every July the University of Michigan Medical School ushers in a new class of future physicians. Those students spend a week in September scattered across the area visiting, conversing, observing, and receiving treatments from holistic practitioners to learn about healthcare from their perspectives.

Posted on December 31, 2014 and filed under Health.

Therapeutic Breathwork Training (a story)

I re-experienced my own birth the other day, for the third time in a week. I was in Milwaukee, at Transformations, Inc., with Jim Morningstar, a dedicated and compassionate psychotherapist, breath coach, writer, and Therapeutic Breathwork teacher. Sitting in Jim’s comfortable office, after a week of intensive breathwork training and experience, we began the session by talking about what I would like to focus on. I asked for inner child work.

Posted on December 31, 2014 and filed under Health, Calendar Essays.

More Than Just an Exercise: Learning to Breathe with Yoga

By Tatiana Knight | Photos by Tobi Hollander

When yoga became famous in the 60’s in the U.S., it was an esoteric set of poses and breathing exercises to aid meditation. It was initially presented as a map to living our lives by following a kind of yogic 10 Commandments. Not very many people knew about yoga, and those who did were not “normal,” but considered hippies or society’s outliers. 

Fresh Air for a Fresh Start

By Melissa Sargent

We've packed up the holiday decorations, our house guests have all gone home, and we are ready to take on our new year’s resolutions. A little power cleaning and a few sprays of a fresh scent might seem like a great way to start anew. But before you pull out the disinfectant or plug in the pine mountain scent, think about what may be sealed up inside the house with you and your family.

 

Posted on January 1, 2014 and filed under Columns, Winter 2014 Issue, Health.

The Healing Power of the Right Relationship: How Elizabeth Shadigian, M.D., and WomanSafeHealth Are Raising the Standards for Women's Health Care

By Rachel Pastiva | Photos by Rachel Pastiva, Miriam Holzman & Karina Oganyan

A CLIENT'S STORY

I've known for a long time that I'm disillusioned by our medical establishment. What I didn't realize until recently was just how much. Like many people, I suffer from chronic health issues that traditional doctors don't seem to have the time to address, nor the interest in doing so. I thought I was taking my health into my own hands by seeking alternative health care practitioners, but found the same pressed-for-time, distant attitude that ultimately left me financially and emotionally destitute. 

Posted on January 1, 2014 and filed under Health, Winter 2014 Issue, WomenSafeHealth.

An Interview With Julie Peale of Body Balance and Hellerwork and Structural Medicine

Interview by Bill Zirinsky | Photos by Tobi Hollander

Julie Peale, age 38, owns Body Balance of Ann Arbor, LLC, where she practices a combination of Hellerwork and structural medicine in one-on-one sessions with clients. Initially on a path to become a physical therapist, Julie attained a degree in biology from Central Michigan University, but her desire to help people on a more holistic level pushed her to explore other therapy modalities. Julie lives in Ypsilanti Township with her husband, five-year-old daughter, and two-year-old son.

Posted on December 31, 2013 and filed under Health, Winter 2014 Issue.